[Ivo Andrić] epub Na Drini ćuprija Read online



10 thoughts on “Na Drini ćuprija

  1. says:

    History builds its monuments on the human blood History is a cruel mistressThe common people remember and tell of what they are able to grasp and what they are able to transform into legend Anything else passes them by without deeper trace with the dumb indifference of nameless natural phenomena which do not touch the imagination or remain in the memory This hard and long building process was for them a foreign task undertaken

  2. says:

    Na Drini ćuprija The Bridge on the Drina Bosnian Trilogy #1 Ivo AndrićThe story spans about four centuries and covers the Ottoman and Austro Hungarian occupations of the region with a particular emphasis on the lives de

  3. says:

    Finished About a bridge a beautiful bridge Through this bridge one finds hope But the book is also about the passage of time and the folly of man and the peoples and cultures of the Balkans One percieves the smallness of man There are no clear

  4. says:

    Spanning centuries in time The Bridge on the Drina is one monumental work that pulled me in right from the off Set on and around the bridge the little town of Višegard and all its surroundings hamlets nestling in the folds of steep hills lush meadows pastures and orchards Andric really does a great job of bringing everything to life The bridge central to the town's existence in good times and bad ties toget

  5. says:

    Images and myths purport to the mythic Ivo Andric crafted a monument to those expectations in his novel of stories He challenges the eternal with a construct much as engineers spanned the natural with bridges Once present the innovations often appear eternal timeless It is a sincere hope that The Bridge on the

  6. says:

    “Between the fear that something would happen and the hope that still it wouldn't there is much space than one thinks On that narrow hard bare and dark space a lot of us spend our lives” ― Ivo AndrićPublished in 1945 but written earlier probably during the war years when Nobel Prize winner Andrić had given up his diplomatic

  7. says:

    Beautiful stories centered around one bridge following the society and individual fates throughout centuries It made me feel nostalgic and melancholic like most Bosnian authors make me feel It reminded me of wri

  8. says:

    About five years ago an American friend of mine whose book taste I completely respected told me about this book He

  9. says:

    Stunning sweeping and awesome fiction book that gives the history of the Balkans through the lens of the life of a bridge from the 16th century to the World War II by the Nobel Prize winning author Ivo Andric A must read for anyone who wants to understand the complexity of Balkan conflict A tragic story but very touching and beautifully written

  10. says:

    Ivo Andric's chronicle is a series of utterly engaging vignettes that bring to life Bosnia's rich and troubled history Serbs Croats Jews and

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Read ô PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Í Ivo Andrić

?γικά γεγονότα των τελευταίων ετών στη Βοσνία και να διακρίνει τις ανθρώπινες δυνάμεις που πάντα λειτουργούσαν κάτω από την πολυεθνική κρούστα και το μωσαϊκό των θρησκειών Το αριστούργημα του μεγάλου νομπελίστα συγγραφέα. About five years ago an American friend of mine whose book taste I completely respected told me about this book He was so enthusiastic I knew someday I would read it even though I had never heard of the author never heard of the book and knew nothing about Bosnia I never suspected then that I would eventually be living in Istanbul someday be familiar with Ottoman history up close and have walked a historic Mimar Sinan stone bridge with my very own feet What a book What an author And what a translator This book is a haunting wonderful memoir exuisitely rendered in time and place A young Christian boy is taken to the Ottoman capital to serve the Ottoman Empire He converts Eventually he rises to a position of advisor to the Sultan The Balkan native decides to use his position to build a stone bridge designed by the great Ottoman architect Mimar Sinan to commemorate the land he came from and to glorify God The book The Bridge on the Drina is a fictionalized history of all that happened on that bridgeWe often assign metaphysical powers to grand urban assets like the Eiffel Tower but this book made the reader cherish a rural stone bridge as a precious jewel that made life grander and meaningful for all the villagers who come in contact with it Could a man made creation serve a nobler purposeIvo Andri is almost like a Balkan Mark Twain so great were his powers of observation about human nature sometimes wryly so You can not read this book without feeling he has an enormous love for humanity because he can describe people at their worst their weakest and best with such compassion and grace it s impossible not to love his writing for that fact alone I found myself writing down sentences within the book just to savor their genius later After I finished the book I looked the author up on Wikipedia and I realized I had no idea while reading the book what faith he was because he wrote about the Christian and Muslim villagers with such insight you could almost think he had both faiths in his family Ah such is the BalkansWhat a patriot this man was He had an ability to make the whole world care about his little corner and love it as he did I want to read everything else he has written

Free read Na Drini ćuprija

Na Drini ćuprija

Το γεφύρι του Δρίνου δεν είναι μόνο ένα σημαντικό μυθιστόρημα Είναι ένα βαλκανικό χρονικό τεσσάρων αιώνων ιστορίας τεσσάρων θρησκειών και τριών εθνοτήτων που μοιράζονται τον ίδιο τόπο την πόλη Βίσιεγκραντ στη Βοσνία Στο ?. Finished About a bridge a beautiful bridge Through this bridge one finds hope But the book is also about the passage of time and the folly of man and the peoples and cultures of the Balkans One percieves the smallness of man There are no clear answers Is it foolish to hope for a better future and what is better How does one judge progress If there is kindness isn t life good People are weak and mean and foolish but at the same time they are kind and good and hard working Both are true and both will probably always be true I believe the book says thisThrough page 199 One minute I am thinking I cannot go on reading because the cruelty of one human to another is just than I can take The writing moves me so but then the lines change and the author makes me see the beauty of life I am totally stunned The writing flips me from one emotion to its opposite The words in this books do this to me This author can write and he can see how people are how terrible and how wonderfulThrough pPage 81 Still marvelous Beautiful writing Legends and myths and history all intertwined The bridge is built 1571 1577 and it certainly wasn t easy These troubles became the basis of fabulous legends Then in the latter half of the 1700s their was a flood terrible than any ever before The waters rose a good thirty feet and the bridge was submerged only to become visible again as the river s level lowered The damage and devastation wrought by the flood was horrible but of course time rolled on life in the village continuedSo in the kapiathe terrace at the center of the bridge between the skies the river and the hills generation after generation learnt not to mourn overmuch what the troubled waters had borne away They entered there into the unconscious philosophy of the town that life was an incomprehensible marvel since it was incessantly wasted and spent yet none the less it lasted and endured like the bridge on the Drina I recommend looking at this bridge when you read the book It is easy to find pictures on the web of this beautiful eleven arched stone bridge How what happened became myth is fascinating The Serbian Croatian Bosnian and Turkish cultures and their respective religious constraints are described through the history fo this bridge the bridge over the Drina at Visegrad in Bosnia Page 52 read This author can write A Nobel prize winner that can really write that not only has a message but can truly write Dam this is GOOD He makes you see beauty and he makes you see horror There is no skimming here you want to catch every nuance My heart is beating and I don t know what to do with myself I have to stop before I can go on

Read ô PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Í Ivo Andrić

?έντρο όλων αυτών το γεφύρι αμετακίνητο από τη θέση του σαν το πεπρωμένο που διατρέχει πότε φωτεινό και πότε σκοτεινό τις ανθρώπινες ζωές Μόνο αν διαβάσει κανείς το προφητικό αυτό έργο μπορεί πραγματικά να κατανοήσει τα τρ?. Between the fear that something would happen and the hope that still it wouldn t there is much space than one thinks On that narrow hard bare and dark space a lot of us spend our lives Ivo Andri Published in 1945 but written earlier probably during the war years when Nobel Prize winner Andri had given up his diplomatic work and was living as uietly as anyone could in Belgrade during those years of upheaval The Bridge Over the Drina is the rather unusually told history of the town of Vi egrad in the south east of Bosnia near the border with Serbia The period of time covered by the book is exactly the lifespan of the monumental bridge which was built at Vi egrad around 1570 by the Ottomans and which survived undamaged until 1914 While the book focuses on the town and its inhabitants the bridge itself is the main character the hero the unifying force and the rationale of this entire chronicle The author succeeds in making his account as interesting and as full of suspense as any novel by weaving history myth and story together in a very natural way which allows the narrative to move fluidly from the general to the particular and back again so that the reader is swept along in the torrent of words and happenings There were violent times in the history of the bridge and I have to admit that I skimmed over the most harrowing episode which occurred near the beginning but fortunately there were no such scenes recounted The town of Vi egrad during the period of the narrative was home to Muslims and Jews Orthodox Christians and Roman Catholics Turks and Greeks Bosnians Croats and Serbs Montenegrins and Italians Galicians and Poles Austrians and Hungarians and according to Andri they all lived fairly peacefully together for the most part He implies that the takeover by the Hapsburg Empire towards the end of the nineteenth century and the dragging of the town into the modern age via the railway sounded the death knell of that peaceful co existence