[Aping Mankind download] Pdf By Raymond Tallis


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Aping Mankind

Tallis argues that the rise of biologism has serious conseuences and demonstrates that by denying human uniueness and minimizing the. I actually finished this a week after getting it early last month It s one of those books that I wrote lots of notes alongside and I haven t yet had time to do a collated review but I will do one later as I think it s an important book Just a few points here First there is an awful lot I disagree with That s fine That s how it should be That s what conversations produce discussions arguments But the book itself is well written well structured fair and honest it is often rhetorical ironic downright sarcastic and vituperative but it wears it well The Launcelott Spratt bombastic tone is a bit annoying at times but also kind of endearing The main thing is Tallis has given us a swashbuckling demolition job on Neuromania and the horrendous drift towards identifying the mind with the brain What s he shows clearly why this is not some arcane academic dispute but of central importance to our society and culture I cannot think of a fortuitous book to come my way after the despair induced by that dreadful Master and His Emissary by Iain McGilchrist I have reviewed that book and am most concerned that my low rating of it is against the grain Why there are respectable people out there who think McGilchrist is erudite because he has an average knowledge of art literature and philosophy Curiously Mary Midgley has blurb on the back of McGilchrist s book praising it and blurb on the back of Tallis s book praising that too even though the latter refers to the former as representing the extremest form of Neuromania That s philosophers for you Anyway I ll come back to this soon Make your own model forts & castles rise of biologism has serious conseuences and demonstrates that by denying human uniueness and minimizing the. I actually finished this a week after getting it early last month It s one of those books that I wrote lots of notes alongside and I haven t yet had time to do a collated Tremors of Fury (The Days of Ash and Fury review but I will do one later as I think it s an important book Just a few points here First there is an awful lot I disagree with That s fine That s how it should be That s what conversations produce discussions arguments But the book itself is well written well structured fair and honest it is often How Julian and Nigel Turned Each Other Gay (Inadvertently), or So They Both Claim rhetorical ironic downright sarcastic and vituperative but it wears it well The Launcelott Spratt bombastic tone is a bit annoying at times but also kind of endearing The main thing is Tallis has given us a swashbuckling demolition job on Neuromania and the horrendous drift towards identifying the mind with the brain What s he shows clearly why this is not some arcane academic dispute but of central importance to our society and culture I cannot think of a fortuitous book to come my way after the despair induced by that dreadful Master and His Emissary by Iain McGilchrist I have The Mage (Foxcraft, Book 3) reviewed that book and am most concerned that my low Illustrated Workbook for Self-Therapy for Your Inner Critic rating of it is against the grain Why there are Earthfall (Homecoming, respectable people out there who think McGilchrist is erudite because he has an average knowledge of art literature and philosophy Curiously Mary Midgley has blurb on the back of McGilchrist s book praising it and blurb on the back of Tallis s book praising that too even though the latter A Daddy for Christmas refers to the former as Banned in Britain representing the extremest form of Neuromania That s philosophers for you Anyway I ll come back to this soon

free download ¶ eBook or Kindle ePUB è Raymond Tallis

Account of humanity He suggests that seeing ourselves as animals may lead us to find reasons for treating others as less than human. Very very few books can claim to have changed my mind about something fundamental This one did Not an easy read tightly argued occasionally polemical and ultimately convincing me that my prior views were probably mistaken Lila and Alex short story. X-Rated. reasons for treating others as less than human. Very very few books can claim to have changed my mind about something fundamental This one did Not an easy Burning Attraction read tightly argued occasionally polemical and ultimately convincing me that my prior views were probably mistaken

Raymond Tallis è 3 read & download

Differences between humans and their nearest animal kin it misrepresents what we are offering a grotesuely simplified and degrading. The classic philosophers debate about mind goes like this do we have nonphysical spiritsminds or does mind have a purely physical basis In favor of a nonphysical mind one might point out that even with today s best available technology scientists are not yet able to correlate a person s every thought with a visual image of their brain activity Since mind is invisible or cannot yet be pointed to as a visual image and its origins are mysterious therefore it must be nonphysical On the other hand in favor of a physically grounded mind one might say that simply because science has not yet unraveled the exceedingly complex and delicate workings of the brain does not mean that the brain will prove insufficient to explain consciousness Appealing to fanciful spirits will not answer these unanswered uestions it merely creates a silly fiction that looks like an answer Further if mind is nonphysical the very idea of nonphysicality generates some unanswerable uestions such as How can a nonphysical spirit be located in a physical body and How can a nonphysical spirit exchange information with its physical body Aping Mankind caught my attention because I wanted to hear Raymond Tallis argue against the idea that consciousness is caused purely by physical attributes In this day and age are there any good scientifically supported arguments for a nonphysical spirit Would Tallis an atheist and medical scientist defend the idea of ghostsNo he doesn t which left me bewildered and disappointed In this book Tallis bypasses the classic debate He manages to argue at great length against the idea that consciousness is entirely grounded in the brain without giving adeuate attention to the obvious follow up uestion OK but there s no ghosts right If consciousness is not in the brain where is it He doesn t really explain at least not in enough detail to satisfy someone who has just waded through his 361 page argument He alludes to the pre modern nature of belief in ghosty souls but he never explicitly personally rejects this pre modern belief nor does he present a clear alternativeToward the end he devotes a few pages to explaining what he thinks is missing from our theory of consciousness Our sense of self is based on linked ideas and shared culture he says Taking photographs of a single person s brain ignores the connections between people the relationships that make us who we are Yes indeed our minds are shaped by interaction with other people But what I must ask is the metaphysical nature of this interaction this culture Is culture too a ghost a nonphysical stratum in which are suspended nonphysical souls Or does culture in addition to its behavioral and historical characteristics that are truly shared facts instantiate itself in each individual s brain as a personal evolving concept and thus is it as physically grounded as the rest of our ideas If scientists knew how to fully read a living thinking brain could they in principle see culture in there too along with every other part of the personality Why notTallis is not principally arguing against the idea that mind is material At least I don t think so it s hard to tell That s a uestion I think he needed to address but it s not what he focused on As indicated in the book s subtitle he s principally arguing against what he calls neuromania the idea that neuroscientist s photographs of brain activity can explain everything there is to know about human consciousness including lofty complex ideas like religion art and memory and Darwinitis the compulsive attribution of all human thought and behavior to whatever maximizes survival The former is central to his argument I have never perceived neuromania as a special problem While many people myself included believe that their most complex ideas and intense feelings are ultimately grounded in the physical brain I don t know anyone who suffers the neuromaniac delusion that confuses a blurry uninterpreted photograph of a brain with the subjective feeling of consciousness itself As Tallis is a neuroscientist perhaps he has indeed met people who suffer this delusion because they are neuroscientists invested in inflating the significance of their research methods but if so it seems that neuromania afflicts mainly neuroscientists and not the general population Maybe the book is best read as a cautionary tale for neuroscientistsThis book has many good ualities Tallis is witty well read and original He has firmly held atheist beliefs but doesn t feel the need to remind the reader of it constantly refreshingly preferring to engage the reader in a discussion of ideas rather than a duel of identities He believes in evolution and doesn t waste time defending it in this book presuming that his reader can appreciate a philosophical discussion that assumes twenty first century science Nor is he anti religion The book even won a blurb of praise from Roger Scruton a philosopher who has defended the role of religion in public life Tallis recognizes that religious beliefs contain meaning that is important for anyone studying human consciousness and he s not averse to the sparse use of the word spirituality to describe a certain human need when no other word will do He has written some delightful passages on what he calls Thatter the tendency of humans to use language to represent things as facts that which another book I m simultaneously reading has termed metarepresentationMy frustration with Aping Mankind is just that it elided the uestion of consciousness as ghost consistently throughout many densely written pages through which I spent an inordinate number of hours searching for what I was hoping it would say This book may be very useful to someone writing a philosophy thesis on the topic of mind as there are many excellently expressed original ideas but I wouldn t recommend this as an introductory text because for me it hopped over some of the central issues


10 thoughts on “Aping Mankind

  1. says:

    Tallis takes on neuroscientists and evolutionary psychologists who he argues reduce humans to beasts We have bodily functions like animals but beyond that we're ualitatively different and exceptional Our distinctive trait is consciou

  2. says:

    Raymond Tallis understands something that many in the cruder reaches of online atheism do not humanism and materialism are not only n

  3. says:

    I actually finished this a week after getting it early last month It's one of those books that I wrote lots of notes alongs

  4. says:

    Raymond Tallis plays the Renaissance Man learned in the sciences and humanities come to debunk the twin evils of Neuromania and Darwinitis in Aping Mankind Let me start off by pointing out where I'm in agreement with Tallis He didn't need to convince me that there is an epidemic of over inflated claims coming out of a collection of fields

  5. says:

    I've enjoyed the Tallis style of fisticuffs ever since I first read his barbed assault on post structuralism in Not Saussure In the last 15 years I've bought far of his books than I've finished but I did make through this one – despite his

  6. says:

    The classic philosophers' debate about mind goes like this do we have nonphysical spiritsminds or does mind have a purely physical basis? In favor of a nonphysical mind one might point out that even with today's best available technology scie

  7. says:

    A very good antidote to Neuroscience and Evolutionary Psychology overreach Fascinating things have come from the

  8. says:

    This is a really hard read Tallis is obviously well read and a gifted thinker but this also makes him a hard read if the topics in science and philosophy are not things you are already familiar with as he is a name dropper and many of the names may mean nothing to you His writing style is also difficult at times as you have to car

  9. says:

    Very very few books can claim to have changed my mind about something fundamental This one did Not an easy read tightly argued occasionally polemical and ultimately convincing me that my prior views were probably mistaken

  10. says:

    Tallis has written one very good book and one mediocre book and they are both between the same two covers The first half of Aping M

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