[family law Books] Ebook Planet of the Bugs By Scott Richard Shaw – Epub, eBook and Kindle ePUB free

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Ns such as small body size wings metamorphosis and parasitic behavior have enabled insects to disperse widely occupy increasingly narrow niches and survive global catastrophes in their rise to dominance Through buggy tales by turns bizarre and comical from caddisflies that construct portable houses or weave silken auatic nets to trap floating debris to parasitic wasp larvae that develop in the blood of host insects and by storing waste products in their rear ends are able to postpone defecation until after they emerge he not only unearths how changes in our planet’s geology flora a. The golden salad days of wasp parasitism Back in the very early days of internal parasitism one of the wasps managed to soil its own hypodermic ovipositor with some virus particles were injected along with a wasp egg into a hapless host insect The virus replicateddisabling the immune system Once immune systems were disabled eggs and larvae could wallow in insect bloodParasitic wasps particularly the wicked tiny ones are Shaw s particular thing in Entomolgy so it s no surprise that their evolution is the most developed topic in the book No complaints here it s probably my favorite topic in bugdom too Definitely a good read for those of us with an inner or outer Science Nerd I took away all sorts of new neat stuff from Planet of the Bugs I m going to hold a bar crowd s attention with rhapsodies on the Grylloblattidae ice bugs which live atop freezing mountains and feed on the carcasses of flying insects which became windswept to a frozen end It s easy to catch the sultry appeal of Aleiodes shakirae the little parasitic wasp named for Shakira but I know there s got to be a way to make the Mantophasmatodae sound sexy They are gladiator bugs after allAs for sociopolitical economic chatter Shaw left me with this juicy idea It s not the world s current insatiable need for electric lights and big ass SUV s which threaten the supply of fossil fuels Rather blame it all on those goddamned insects and their lousy fucking ecosystem building ways which ended the Carboniferous Period No coal swamp production truly screwed us out of unlimited sources of hydrocarbons to help burn away our global health Up yours arthropods Aleiodes shakirae injection of an egg into a caterpillar causes it to undulate as if belly dancing For additional demented trips through the Magic Realm of Arthropods check into Jackass on a Camel Fossils Freaks Mayhem in the Cradle of Mankind 1038 am Maralal Central Time I was face up on my sleeping bag staring at the ugliest animal I ve ever seen A god awful huge and mutated wasp It was as grotesuely deformed as I felt grotesuely poisoned Two thirds of it was waspish enough head thorax and wings were the stuff of God s most badass bug But its abdomen was something entirely different extending like a tumorous knockwurst or parasitic maggot the color of a spoiled yam Maybe it was a ueen hornet looking to discharge a glob of eggs into my chest That nasty gut recalled the egg sac of the mother bug in Aliens Aw fuck it was going to pump eggs in my thorax so I d burst into a swarm of gruesome little girls at the supper table Dammit That just wasn t the way I wanted to go out

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Planet of the Bugs

Nd fauna contributed to insects’ success but also how in return insects came to shape terrestrial ecosystems and amplify biodiversity Indeed in his visits to hyperdiverse rain forests to highlight the current insect extinction crisis Shaw reaffirms just how crucial these tiny beings are to planetary health and human survival In this age of honeybee die offs and bedbugs hitching rides in the spines of library books Planet of the Bugs charms with humor affection and insight into the world’s six legged creatures revealing an essential importance that resonates across time and space. The First StepsFrom the earliest invasion of land to today s uncounted millions the Arthropods have dominated our planet On land the jointed foot clan is mostly represented by the insects and this is their story In Planet of the Bugs biologist Scott Richard Shaw takes the reader on the ultimate field trip back to those first steps through the long eons of deep time and forward to our modern world for an in depth look on how the insects have come to rule the landscape For me this was a very satisfying read on paleontology and evolutionary biology with the focus on insects and related Arthropods If you are a dedicated science reader you may find yourself covering some familiar ground just told from a different viewpoint The author s writing is for the most part geared for the layman reader with less technical jargon but out of necessity you will find plenty of scientific names for the geologic ages and the insects discussed many of them have no common names Dr Shaw has spent his career studying insects both modern and fossil forms so any speculation he does is based on his extensive knowledge of this field In gathering material for Planet of the Bugs and his own personal research Dr Shaw was aided by several of his students and with the collaboration of various colleagues from around the world I especially liked his writeup on the Yanayacu Cloud Forrest of Ecuador and of the many specialists who work at the research station there This excellent book is not just about bugs it s also about geological time and how all life forms change to fit into a constantly changing environment Covered too is the human impact on our biosphere and what the future may hold for not only insects but for all life forms including Man Written in clear layman friendly proses with just a touch of humor Planet of the Bugs is well worth the time of anyone interested on how our world work and how small changes can lead to unforeseen results I highly recommend this book I had no technical or downloading problems with this Kindle editionLast Ranger

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Dinosaurs however toothy did not rule the earth and neither do humans But what were and are the true potentates of our planet Insects says Scott Richard Shaw millions and millions of insect species Starting in the shallow oceans of ancient Earth and ending in the far reaches of outer space where Shaw proposes insect like aliens may have achieved similar preeminence Planet of the Bugs spins a sweeping account of insects’ evolution from humble arthropod ancestors into the bugs we know and love or fear and hate today Leaving no stone unturned Shaw explores how evolutionary innovatio. This book covers a really interesting subject but the author almost spoils things He s an extremely awkward guide alternately dropping strident monologues about the importance of bugs really bad poetry and journal entries and self aggrandizing preening about his accomplishments with bonus petty digs at his grad students Clearly he or his editor intended to pitch this to a general pop sci audience but they did a lazy job of it and the tone is an odd mishmash There s not enough detail or explanation of certain points for a lay audience but it s also too breezy for a specialist I wish there had been detailed descriptions of the creatures he describes because I often had to turn to secondary sources to learn about the bugs the author mentions Further the last chapter and postscript are both embarrassing in their own ways one is a gawky paean to the diversity of the insect world and the other is a sweaty fantasy of cosmological importance for the author s chosen field without proof or plausibility Despite these serious faults I enjoyed the book because he s right that the vast proliferation and evolutionary success of arthropods of various kinds is a fascinating topic and a lynchpin for almost every conceivable ecological web on this world


10 thoughts on “Planet of the Bugs

  1. says:

    This book is not for the scientifically illiterate If you don't know what a pronotum is or are unwilling to look up the meaning of the word ecdysis in the middle of reading a paragraph this is not the book for you There's nothing WRONG with that that's just your style of readingIf you like science and have a passing familiarity with insects

  2. says:

    This is a well written work popular science work on the fossil history of insects throughout the world from their origins up until today in terms of their evolution interaction with environments of the past and in some cases extincti

  3. says:

    This book covers a really interesting subject but the author almost spoils things He's an extremely awkward guide alternately dropping striden

  4. says:

    The author reviews the development of insects through the geological periods Attention is given to the geological state of t

  5. says:

    The golden salad days of wasp parasitism Back in the very early days of internal parasitism one of the wasps managed to soil its own hypodermic ovipositor with some virus particles were injected along with a wasp egg into a hapless host insect The virus replicateddisabling the immune system Once immune systems

  6. says:

    This is an interesting look at the evolution and rise of insects from the Cambrian to the present day Professor Shaw details the roles that arthropods and specifically insects have played in evolution and how these creatures affected the evolution of plants and other animal species He takes a look at why oil wa

  7. says:

    The First StepsFrom the earliest invasion of land to today's uncounted millions the Arthropods have dominated our planet On land the jointed foot clan is mostly represented by the insects and this is their story In Planet of the Bugs biologist Scott Richard Shaw takes the reader on the ultimate field trip; back to those first steps through the long eons of deep time and forward to our modern world for an in depth look on how the i

  8. says:

    When do children lose their rubbernecked uality? asks Scott Richard Shaw when talking about little children fascinated by bugs It's a valid uestion for him because Planet of the Bugs feels like a an eight year old in a toy store switching attention from toy to another without purpose or sense talking excitedly about each o

  9. says:

    So first off if you don't like bugs especially wasps to some degree I wouldn't recommend this Reading some of the numbers off to my husband was probably not wise as he was very uncomfortable with them If you do enjoy insects though I really do recommend this I will admit on my sleepier days it did put me to sleep but on the whole it was a fascinating and insightful read Scott Richard Shaw has a great conversat

  10. says:

    I loved this book I am not sure exactly why Maybe it was Shaw's conversational tone and his enthusiasm for the subject Millions of species of bugs with all manner of clever solutions to life challenges

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