ePUB Arabian Sands Download – Book or eBook



10 thoughts on “Arabian Sands

  1. says:

    It was at school that we were given an excerpt of Arabian Sands to read a passage detailing the peoples who had lurked on the fringes of Arabia

  2. says:

    I like to browse through my books on a Sunday morning for some strange reason and came across this book that I read when I was working in Saudi Arabia and as I had also met the bedouin and taken tea with them I was interested to hear about Thesiger's travels in that country It's such an interesting study of the Saudi culture by a travel writer and also an explorer such as Thesiger and I highly recommend it to

  3. says:

    “There was a very lovely girl working with the others on the well Her hair was braided except where it was cut in a fringe across her forehead and fell in a curtain of small plaits round her neck She wore various silver ornaments and several necklaces some of large cornelians others of small white beads Round her waist she had half a dozen silver chains and above them her sleeveless blue tunic gaped open to show small firm breasts She

  4. says:

    Wilfred Thesiger was born a few centuries too late given his enterprising spirit and his thirst for the pristine lands untouched by human deve

  5. says:

    When I first came across this book in the library I was unsuspecting of the journey it would take me on but I find now that I have been on that journey I am all the richer for itWilfred Thesiger was wonderful company as I rolled along on a camel beside him not literally of course taking in the sights of a desert that has long since been tarnished by the westIf you want to learn about the Bedu and indirectly th

  6. says:

    The Arabist Tradition of Wildred Thesiger “In the desert I had found a freedom unattainable in civilization; a life unhampered by possessions since everything that was not a necessity was an encumbrance” The tragedy was the choice would not be theirs Economic forces beyond their control would eventually drive them into the towns to hang about street corners as unskilled street labour I realised that the Bedu were d

  7. says:

    Thesiger’s book is about a time right after many people thought most of the great adventures had already been had and right before the frontiers of the desert sands were truly closed off The book was one man’s love affair with the hardship of desert sand and the people who had called it their home the Bedu I came to this book at a strange time At a time when one journey was ending and another beginning Strangely I d

  8. says:

    The Last of the Barefoot ExplorersWhen I was a kid I dreamt of being an explorer Never mind that I had never been out of New England and had no possibility of doing so Discovering new lands and peoples seemed such a great job What I couldn't figure out was how you got BE an explorer ? What did you take a course someplace ? Once in

  9. says:

    Before I start I have to declare I was pretty apprehensive about this book and it sat on my shelves for a long time I am a big Thesiger fan a

  10. says:

    I love travelogues but this one took a while for me to get into Obviously I am not that interested in the arid sandy deserts or in the lives of the people who live there But Thesiger draws me into his story gradually His re

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

FREE READ Ë WIKIWEBDIR.CO.UK · Wilfred Thesiger

Ss and rigidity of Western life the machines the calling cards the meticulously aligned streets In the spirit of T E Lawrence he set out to explore the deserts of Arabia travelin. The Arabist Tradition of Wildred Thesiger In the desert I had found a freedom unattainable in civilization a life unhampered by possessions since everything that was not a necessity was an encumbrance The tragedy was the choice would not be theirs Economic forces beyond their control would eventually drive them into the towns to hang about street corners as unskilled street labour I realised that the Bedu were doomed Some people maintain that they will be better off when they have exchanged the hardship and poverty of the desert for the security of a materialistic world This I do not believe Here in the desert I had found all that I asked for I knew I should never find it again

READ Arabian Sands

Arabian Sands

G among peoples who had never seen a European and considered it their duty to kill Christian infidels His now classic account is invaluable to understanding the modern Middle Eas. Before I start I have to declare I was pretty apprehensive about this book and it sat on my shelves for a long time I am a big Thesiger fan and his books are excellent and I find myself limiting my reading of them to one a year I was concerned I wouldn t like this one for a couple of reasons I read a Penguin Great Journeys excerpt book with parts carved from Arabian Sands Across the Empty uarter and didn t like it much I found it an awkward selection of excerpts without much explanation or flow At the time I had hoped it was just the excerpt not the original textIt seems odd in overview that some hopping about in Abyssinia Ethiopia and Sudan then two trips across The Empty uarter the big empty bit in the middle of the Arabian Peninsular and then some trips around the edge through Saudi Arabia Oman and Yemen would make a long interesting narrative Throw in the fact Thesiger travels with a small core of companions but with a larger entourage which changed up a bit and did I mention sand at all and a lack of water this could have been a snore festThankfully neither of these were an issue in Arabian Sands Somehow Thesiger successfully transmits his own very real passion for The Empty uarter and for the Bedu Bedouin to us uninformed people shines through his writing His respect for the Budu way of life and his foreseeing that the newly arrived oil company explorers and negotiators will have a negative effect on their culture is an interesting aspect to his story The timeframe 1945 1950 is particularly interesting Saudi Arabia and the Trucial Coast a pre cursor to the United Arab Emirates had not verified oil reserves and were not the wealthy counties they are now Dubai is described as a village Even motor vehicles were limited in these places and again Thesiger predicted a future of the deserts being crossed with automobiles and what limited animals oryx in particular would be decimatedThesiger s interactions with the many different tribes many at war or with blood feuds or just a mutual dislike are a lesson in planning and diplomacy The whole way of life of the Bedu is so different to Thesiger s England and yet he was so enad by it He mentioned a couple of times while practically starving surviving on a uart of water per day for weeks on end bitter brackish water at that walking for 10 hours a day that he simply considered whether he would rather be back in England or he with the Bedu and each time he remained satisfiedThe other thing that occurs while reading this book is how a successful explorer adventurer makes his own luck Some of the circumstances that occur had Thesiger been a week or even a day earlier or later then he would have been caught up in an altercation he would be unlikely to survive The multiple times that Bedu Arab parties were sent out after him with the task of killing the Christian it is incredible that through that combination of luck clever diplomacy and even his ability to bond with people who will go out on a limb to help and protect him also the Bedu etiuette obligation to guests got him through again and again So despite coming across as a crotchety man he must also have been incredibly likeable because many people in this book from his young companions to sheiks and leaders were able to bond with him respect his wishes to undertake unusual and dangerous travel and assist him in any way they couldI feel I am rambling now so will wrap this up and without hesitation bang 5 stars on thisThere are heaps of excellent uotes here are a few I had learnt the satisfaction which comes from hardship and the pleasure which derives from abstinence the contentment of a full belly the richness of meat the taste of clean water the ecstasy of surrender when the craving of sleep becomes a torment the warmth of a fire in the chill of dawn While I was with the Arabs I wished only to live as they lived and now that I have left them I would gladly think that nothing in their lives was altered by my coming Regretfully however I realize that the maps I made helped others with material aims to visit and corrupt a people whose spirit once lit the desert like a flame I pondered on this desert hospitality and compared it with our own I remembered other encampments where I had slept small tents on which I had happened in the Syrian desert and where I had spent the night Gaunt men in rags and hungry looking children had greeted me and bade me welcome with the sonorous phrases of the desert Later they had set a great dish before me rice heaped round a sheep which they had slaughtered over which my host poured liuid golden butter until it flowed down on to the sand and when I protested saying Enough Enough had answered that I was a hundred times welcome Their lavish hospitality had always made me uncomfortable for I had known that as a result of it they would go hungry for days Yet when I left them they had almost convinced me that I had done them a kindness by staying with them In the desert I had found a freedom unattainable in civilization a life unhampered by possessions since everything that was not a necessity was an encumbrance And finally after spending five years on the Arabian PeninsularOne evening the Political Officer who had taken over from Noel Jackson came to dinner He led me aside and said I am afraid Thesiger that I have a rather embarrassing duty to perform The Sultan of Muscat His Highness Sayid Saiyad Bin Taimur has demanded that we should cancel your Muscat visa I have been instructed to do so by our Political Resident I am afraid I must therefore have your passport I replied All right I ll get it but you realize I ve never had a Muscat visa

FREE READ Ë WIKIWEBDIR.CO.UK · Wilfred Thesiger

Arabian Sands is Wilfred Thesiger's record of his extraordinary journey through the parched Empty uarter of Arabia Educated at Eton and Oxford Thesiger was repulsed by the softne. It was at school that we were given an excerpt of Arabian Sands to read a passage detailing the peoples who had lurked on the fringes of Arabia Felix without actually controlling it coming across the book at the town library I borrowed it and read onWilfred Thesiger travelled backwards and forwards across the Empty uarter of southern Arabia in the late 1940s and early 50s With the subseuent discovery and extraction of oil this is now a record of a vanished worldComing from a privileged British background his father had been ambassador to Abyssinia and one of Thesiger s early experiences was seeing the Abyssinian army jogging off to battle an insurgent as a young man he travelled ion the inhospitable Danakil depression and after the Second World War travelled across the Empty uarter of southern Arabia repeatedly in between other adventures he was an alien in the deserts of Arabia His access to some areas was restricted if I remember correctly the then Sultan of Oman was hostile to non Muslims travelling on his territoryThesiger s focus was on exploration which meant spending time in the desert with a small number of guides rather than on ethnography and his views reflect his reading and his general attitudes about civilisation he s sympathetic to the hard lives lived in extreme circumstances But it remains an entertaining book featuring Thesiger s wonder at the hardiness of his companions as they struggle over the dunes on a diet of rice and raisins utterly dependant on the health of their camels to surviveWorth contrasting with his book The Marsh Arabs Thesiger s autobiography The Life of my Choice puts his journey in the context of his life it is worth remembering that between trips to the Empty uarter he was also sending time in the Kurdish regions and in the marshes of southern Ira It is geography as hardship and hardship as the purest form of adventure Travel as penance maybe certainly not about destinations The charm and good humour of his companions a constant amazement to Thesiger as they stagger over sand dunes and dream of feasting on roast camel hump and they watch uneasy as their male camels are socially obliged to perform stud services to the point of their own exhaustion in accordance with the strict etiuette of the Empty uarter a law of manners that aims to resist feuding to reasonable limits and ensure the survival of people as far as possible in an uninhabitable region